Register  |  Login  |  United States (change)
Exploring color correction tools and techniques in Vegas Pro 10 Q & A

Exploring color correction tools and techniques in Vegas Pro 10 Q & A

 

    Color Correction (Secondary)

    1. Can you explain again how to sample a specific color in the Color Corrector (Secondary)?
    2. Is there a way to solo a color (like blue in a shirt) and swap it for another color?
    3. The Color Correction wheels discussion is very valuable; it would be wonderful to have a seminar on these tools presented by an experienced colorist (this is not a slight; I enjoyed your presentation).
    4. Can you give a brief explanation of the "Computer RGB to Studio RGB" preset in the Secondary Color Corrector?
    5. Can you talk about how to use the eye-dropper tool in the Color Corrector?
    6. In your example [of isolating the colors on the boat], some of the yellow was not isolated. Why is that?

    Stringing multiple color correction filters together

    1. Can you place multiple Color Corrector filters on the same video event?
    2. When applying a Chroma Key effect to a green screen video, should it be before or after a color correction filter in the plug-in chain?
    3. Do you have a best-practices approach to what you do sequentially in the effects chain - say brightness/contrast first, levels second, color corrector third? Does the order of filters matter?
    4. If you have a number of effects set a certain way for an event, and then want to apply all of this chain to several other events quickly, how do you do that?
    5. If you have a video FX chain (with four or six effect plug-ins), does this affect the performance on preview (jerky preview)? Does it affect the final render adversely?
    6. How much does adding multiple filters add to the processing time when rendering?
    7. How do you save a custom effects chain?

    General Questions

    1. What training resources are included when we purchase Sony Vegas Pro?
    2. What is the correct method to do color correction if we have an 18% gray card or Black, gray and white card?
    3. During shooting after color balancing would it help to shoot color bars for reference in color adjustment?
    4. How come Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11 and Vegas Pro 10 don’t support the ATI Radeon HD 5570 GPU?
    5. How is he zooming in and out during the webinar?
    6. I wish there was an "Auto Color" button like Photoshop to create a starting point to tweak.
    7. Is it possible to download this presentation or stream it later?
    8. Unrelated question to the topic: how can I get better quality playback on my PC?
    9. I am interested i knowing if I can stabilize a video clip shot with a hand-held camera.
    10. When will we see webinar on color grading?
    11. How do you calibrate a computer display?
    12. Can we depend on the computer screen to give a true rendering of the color? Might it be different on a TV or projected as a movie?
    13. Is it possible to make a custom mask in another program like Photoshop or Illustrator?
    14. If I want to add 3D composting to a clip between many clips, how can I do that without affecting the other clips, the way I use key frame to reset the rest?
    15. Can this also be the same for Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11?
    16. What program did you use to do the live webinar?
    17. I still have Vegas Pro 9. Does the Automation button replace the keyframe controller area in Vegas Pro 9?
    18. Is it possible to import/convert a LUT (Colour look-up table) to Vegas?
    19. I’m looking for good moving backgrounds and training on how to make them.
    20. How do I trim away a portion out of the middle of an event on my timeline?
    21. Which version is more suitable for functions like trimming off a portion of a video event, adding music into the video, adding text to the video, editing colors and contrast, creating slide shows, and so on? Is it Vegas Pro 10, or Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum Production Suite 11?
    22. Where can I view pre recorded basic training? Such detailed video training is very useful.
    23. In Vegas, you have events on the timeline, not clips. You won't find "clips" when searching the help files.
    24. Who does your hair?
    25. What a hack. It would be nice if the tool allowed multiple colors.
    26. How do you color correct across two tracks (that is, a left and a right channel from two cameras with slightly different colors) before making a 3D subclip?
    27. What was the key stroke for the copy to clipboard for the split screen?

    Video effects signal flow

    1. What has the highest priority of effects, track level or event level?
    2. How do you apply a correction to multiple clips in the project?
    3. I think you can add these filters to both the clip, to an event, to a track, and to the video bus. In terms of workflow is it better to initially color match the clips (that is, standardize the colors) before applying a "film look" color correction, or to correct each event?
    4. How do you apply Brightness and Contrast directly to a clip without picking it from the FX list?

    Monitoring your color correction work

    1. When adjusting color, brightness or contrast, the effect will apply to the entire clip. When you look at the preview window you are looking at a frame. Are the histogram/waveform scopes looking at the frame or clip?
    2. Do you use a CRT monitor for color correction?
    3. Sometimes when you exceed the range of adjustment, you can see an acceptable image in your computer monitor, but it doesn’t look right in your video reference monitor. Is there a way to solve this problem?
    4. When I try to make adjustments to an under exposed image, the result in the computer monitor is really amazing, but the final result is grainy, the contrast is inaccurate and the overall quality is poor. Why?
    5. Is it correct to say that consumer displays usually display high contrast/saturation? If so, is it better to deliver high-contrast/high-saturation material or more low contrast/desaturated video?

    Questions about specific filters and controls

    1. Will you please share a few words on the Sony Soft Contrast filter? Is it a separate universal color correction tool? It has some nice presets indeed.
    2. What filter would you use to colorize black and white footage?
    3. What does the Broadcast Colors filter do?
    4. Doesn't color curves combine the brightness/contrast and levels effects so you could use it exclusively?
    5. Shouldn't my first step in color correction always be white balance?
    6. How do you know when to select the Levels filter or just the Brightness and Contrast filter? Is there any feature in the video you can use as a guide?
    7. Would you please elaborate on the function of "Contrast Center" slider in Brightness and Contrast?
    8. Hi, Mid, and Lo refers to what in the Color Corrector filter?
    9. Can you explain gamma?
    10. With levels and curves, is it required to open up a new instance of the effect to adjust each color channel? As a long time Photoshop user, I'm used to being able to go into each channel while using only one instance.
    11. Personal preference here: I prefer to start with Color Curves for initial adjustments. Brightness and contrast are carry-overs from early analog TVs and not really the best tools to start with for many people familiar with other common "tools for creatives." Curves can actually replace both Brightness and Contrast and Levels.

    Video Scopes

    1. Is there a histogram in the color correction tool?
    2. What are the numbers on the histogram or other video scopes referring too?
    3. How did you get to the video scopes?
    4. So is it desirable to make the upper edge of the histogram even and level?
    5. Could you talk briefly about the Video Scope called RGB Parade?
    6. When the histogram is not full but has spaces between the lines, is that because of lack of detail?
    7. How do you know when to adjust highlight or shadow by looking at monitor or graphs?
    8. Are the limits in video scopes set to broadcast values?
    9. What is the best histogram of video?
    10. Once you have corrected a frame, how do you copy to a range of frames?
    11. What is the best and quickest way to match two cameras?

    The rest

    1. Can you correct his red hand now?
    2. Is there any way to add red back into a video that was shot underwater without a corrective filter?
    3. Is this correction over the whole clip?
    4. How can you avoid adding noise or graininess to a clip you brighten that was too dark or underexposed?
    5. How do these filters affect the quality of the video? Do they introduce video noise and grain?
    6. Why not subtract green?
    7. Why does color correction sometimes create artifacts?
    8. On a recent shoot, I was filming on a Canon 5D mk2 in a totally white studio (with an infinity wall, etc.) and although the whites showed up OK on the camera screen, when imported into Vegas Pro, the footage had a strong yellow cast over it. What is the best way to restore true whites?

    Color Correction (Secondary)

    Can you explain again how to sample a specific color in the Color Corrector (Secondary)?

    Assuming you’re referring to sampling a color in order to define the mask, click the Select effect range button. Then, click or drag over the area that you want to sample.


    Is there a way to solo a color (like blue in a shirt) and swap it for another color?

    Yes. Use the Color Corrector (Secondary) filter for this. This technique is covered extensively in the webinar.


    The Color Correction wheels discussion is very valuable; it would be wonderful to have a seminar on these tools presented by an experienced colorist (this is not a slight; I enjoyed your presentation).

    I agree and we’re looking into it.


    Can you give a brief explanation of the "Computer RGB to Studio RGB" preset in the Secondary Color Corrector?

    The Studio RGB range is more limited than the Computer RGB range. Your computer shows colors in the range from 0 (black) to 255 (white), but video formats and TVs show a range only from 16 to 235. Video shot on a video camera will likely already be in this range, but computer graphics brought in from paint programs or generated from the Vegas Pro media generators may have colors outside of the video standard range and you may get inferior and unexpected results when you (or your viewers) view the video on a TV. The Computer RGB to Studio RGB preset converts from computer color to studio color in a controlled manner so that your video will look nice on a TV. If you are using computer-generated content in something going out to video, you need to apply the Computer to Studio preset, and if you are using video-sourced material for streaming output, you may want to apply the Studio to Computer preset. Keep in mind that many consumer video cameras produce black levels below 16, and frequently white levels above 235, so if you stretch and clamp these you’ll get crushed blacks and whites. So you may skip it in those cases or create a slightly less aggressive filter tuned to your camera.


    Can you talk about how to use the eye-dropper tool in the Color Corrector?

    There are several “eye-dropper” tools in the Color Corrector filter. Each color wheel has its own Choose Complimentary Color and Choose Adjustment Color buttons. To sample a color on your screen and then add more of that color to your video, click the Choose Adjustment Color button for the color tone (Low, Mid, or High) that you want to work with, then click an appropriate area in your video. For example, to sample the high tones in your video, click something that should be white. Vegas Pro analyzes the color of what you clicked on, determines the tint, and then adds more of that color to the video. To sample a color and add its complimentary color (which counteracts the color tone and balances the color), click the Click Complimentary Color button and then click the appropriate point in your video. Vegas Pro samples the color, calculates the hue and saturation of the tint it finds, and adds the complementary color to balance the colors out.


    In your example [of isolating the colors on the boat], some of the yellow was not isolated. Why is that?

    The yellow that didn’t get isolated fell outside of the mask that I had defined with my masking tools. Perhaps the hue of that section of yellow was just different enough to exclude it. In other words, I was sloppy. Had this been a real project, I would have spent more time defining a mask that worked more adequately. To do this I might have attempted to adjust the hue center and width of my mask. If this didn’t give me what I wanted, I would have tried adjustments to the Limit luminance and Limit saturation masking controls. Eventually I would have gotten it right had I taken the time to do so. Chalk it up to user error!


    Stringing multiple color correction filters together

    Can you place multiple Color Corrector filters on the same video event?

    Yes. And sometimes it makes good sense to do so—particularly with the Color Corrector (Secondary) filter—since it sometimes works better to isolate several small color ranges instead of trying to create a mask that encompasses one large range. You can always put as many instances of a plug-in into an effects chain as you want (up to 32).


    When applying a Chroma Key effect to a green screen video, should it be before or after a color correction filter in the plug-in chain?

    It depends. If you’re attempting to color correct the subject (for example, the person standing in front of the screen), you’ll probably want to place the color correction filter after the Chroma Key filter in the chain. However, if you’re attempting to color correct the key area (that is, the green screen, for example) in order to achieve better keying results, you might place the color correction filter before the Chroma Key filter in the chain. Ultimately, whatever position gives you the best results is the proper position!


    Do you have a best-practices approach to what you do sequentially in the effects chain - say brightness/contrast first, levels second, color corrector third? Does the order of filters matter?

    The order of the filters can definitely matter. For instance, say you want to isolate a color with the Color Corrector (Secondary) filter. If you brighten the video up and increase the contrast with the Brightness and Contrast filter within the same chain, then the color you isolate with the Color Corrector (Secondary) filter will be different before the brightening than after the brightening. I don’t really have any official “best practice” advice for ordering in the chain, but in my estimation, it’s easier to isolate the colors in a higher-contrast clip than in a low-contrast clip, so I’d tend to put the Brightness and Contrast filter first in the chain. There may be a professional-colorist-approved answer to this question, but I don’t know it. Ultimately, I make my best guess and try it. If I’m not happy, I try it the other way and see which gives me better results. And the best order may be different when you’re using different filters.


    If you have a number of effects set a certain way for an event, and then want to apply all of this chain to several other events quickly, how do you do that?

    Right-click the event that has the effects you want to apply to other events and choose Copy from the menu. Then, select all of the events you want to apply the same effects to, right-click one of them and choose Paste Event Attributes from the menu. This pastes the effects chain from the first event into all of the selected events. For another approach, put all of the events on the same track and apply the effects at the track level. Track-level effects affect all events on the track.


    If you have a video FX chain (with four or six effect plug-ins), does this affect the performance on preview (jerky preview)? Does it affect the final render adversely?

    Yes to the first question. The more processing you ask your computer to do, the more difficult it is for your computer to give you full-framerate preview. The answer to the second question depends upon what you mean. It could affect the time it takes to complete the render since the computer has more processing to do, but won’t adversely affect the quality of your video.


    How much does adding multiple filters add to the processing time when rendering?

    That varies from computer to computer and would be different depending upon the specific filters you use since each one makes different demands on your processor. But you’ve already honed in on the key issue: the more filters you add to your project, the more demands you put on your computer to process the project. Exactly how much? As the car commercials say, “Your mileage may vary.” Each case is different.


    How do you save a custom effects chain?

    To save an effects chain so you can apply it to another event later, you can create a filter package. To do so, click the Event FX button on the event that holds the chain you want to use again. This opens the Video Event FX window. Now, click the Plug-in Chain button in the Video Event FX window to open the Plug-In Chooser. Notice that the chain appears at the top of the Plug-In Chooser. On the right side of the Plug-In Chooser, click the Save As button. In the Save Plug-In Package dialog box, give your new package a name and click OK and then click OK to close the Plug-in Chooser. Now, on the new event that you want to apply the same filter package to, click the Event FX button. If there are no effects already on this event, the Plug-In Chooser opens. In the tree view on the left, click the Filter Packages folder. From the list of packages, select the one that you just created and click the Add button. Click OK and the effects chain has been successfully applied to the new event.


    General Questions

    What training resources are included when we purchase Sony Vegas Pro?

    The application’s integrated Interactive Tutorials and application help files are invaluable resources. They both give you tons of great information. Beyond that, we have many resources (including lots of free stuff) in the training section of our website at www.sonycreativesoftware.com/training.


    What is the correct method to do color correction if we have an 18% gray card or Black, gray and white card?

    If you’ve calibrated your camera to one of the cards you mention, the techniques for color correction are the same as if you had not. Calibrating to a card like this before you start shooting can great help alleviate your need for color correction in the first place, so it’s a good idea to incorporate this type of white balancing into your camera setup. The best form of color correction is to get the color right when you shoot so you don’t have to add any color-correction filters later!


    During shooting after color balancing would it help to shoot color bars for reference in color adjustment?

    It might. It couldn’t hurt anyway!


    How come Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11 and Vegas Pro 10 don’t support the ATI Radeon HD 5570 GPU?

    GPU support was introduced with Vegas Pro 10. We are looking at expanding this support to a wider range of video cards, although we have made no specific announcements as to which cards will be supported.


    How is he zooming in and out during the webinar?

    We use the Livestream webcasting service and the specific tool on my computer which shares my computer with the audience is their ProCaster software. The zoom tools are built into ProCaster.


    I wish there was an "Auto Color" button like Photoshop to create a starting point to tweak.

    That’s a good suggestion. In the meantime, each filter has several presets that you can start with and tweak from there.


    Is it possible to download this presentation or stream it later?

    Yes, the presentation (along with all of our other webinars) is available for on-demand playback in the training section of our website at www.sonycreativesoftware.com/training.


    Unrelated question to the topic: how can I get better quality playback on my PC?

    The more processor speed and power your PC has, the better the preview experience will be. A 64-bit-capable computer running the 64-bit version of Vegas Pro will give much better playback performance that a 32-bit machine. You can also make sure that your project video properties match the media properties of the media that you’re using on the timeline. If your project has a particularly processor-intensive section that your computer has trouble playing back smoothly, you can use the Dynamic RAM preview feature or prerender that section of the project. As Vegas Pro support for GPU processing offered by some video cards expands, adding one of these devices to your computer will help give better preview playback results.


    I am interested i knowing if I can stabilize a video clip shot with a hand-held camera.

    Yes. Vegas Pro and Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum both have a stabilization feature. To stabilize the media in an event on your timeline, right-click the event and choose Stabilize Media from the menu. Try the different presets to find the one that works most effectively and then adjust the individual parameters from there to zero in on the perfect stabilization settings.


    When will we see webinar on color grading?

    That’s a good topic suggestion and I’ve logged it.


    How do you calibrate a computer display?

    There are a number of different methods and technologies, I suppose and I don’t know the best one. Google is your friend here.


    Can we depend on the computer screen to give a true rendering of the color? Might it be different on a TV or projected as a movie?

    You should make sure that your computer monitor is properly calibrated to show colors as accurately as possible. If you’ve properly calibrated your monitor, then you can be reasonably comfortable that the colors you see are accurate, but a professional reference monitor will give you the best results.


    Is it possible to make a custom mask in another program like Photoshop or Illustrator?

    Yes. You can import custom artwork into your Vegas Pro project and use it as a mask.


    If I want to add 3D composting to a clip between many clips, how can I do that without affecting the other clips, the way I use key frame to reset the rest?

    I assume when you say “clip” you really mean “event” on the timeline. That’s an important distinction. I’m not completely sure I understand this question, but if what you want is to have one event composited in 3D while those before and after it are flat (in 2D), you can accomplish this as you suggest—by setting keyframes at the appropriate locations in


    Can this also be the same for Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11?

    Many (if not most) of the features I discussed in this presentation are also available in Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum 11. I tried to point out when I was using a feature that is available only in Vegas Pro. For a detailed list of differences between Vegas Pro and Studio, please see our comparison chart: http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/moviestudiope/compare.


    What program did you use to do the live webinar?

    We use the LiveStream service.


    I still have Vegas Pro 9. Does the Automation button replace the keyframe controller area in Vegas Pro 9?

    The Automation button does not replace the keyframe controller area from Vegas Pro 9, but that area is hidden in Vegas Pro 10 to conserve space. To access it, click the Automation button.


    Is it possible to import/convert a LUT (Colour look-up table) to Vegas?

    No.


    I’m looking for good moving backgrounds and training on how to make them.

    There are backgrounds that you can import into your Vegas Pro project like those found on our Vision Series products and products from Digital Juice. You can also create many moving background effects with the Vegas Pro media generators in conjunction with keyframing techniques. View the Mastering keyframing techniques webinar and the free training video Working with Media Generators at www.sonycreativesoftware.com/training for some ideas on how to work with media generators and keyframes.


    How do I trim away a portion out of the middle of an event on my timeline?

    The easiest, quickest way to do this is to use the Split/Trim function. Hold Ctrl+Shift+Alt and drag the mouse over the portion of the event you want to remove from your project.


    Which version is more suitable for functions like trimming off a portion of a video event, adding music into the video, adding text to the video, editing colors and contrast, creating slide shows, and so on? Is it Vegas Pro 10, or Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum Production Suite 11?

    Both Vegas Pro and Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum can perform each of these functions. Vegas Pro features more tools and techniques than Vegas Movie Studio HD Platinum.


    Where can I view pre recorded basic training? Such detailed video training is very useful.

    There are many free training videos (including basic training) available at the training section of our website: www.sonycreativesoftware.com/training.


    In Vegas, you have events on the timeline, not clips. You won't find "clips" when searching the help files.

    That’s true. I sometimes refer to the media that an event holds as a clip as in media clip or video clip. During this presentation I may have been sloppy with my terminology a time or two and referred to an event as a clip. You are right to point out this error.


    Who does your hair?

    I’m not sure whether I should take that as a positive question or not, but I’ll choose to. Either way, you wouldn’t believe me if I told you! Or…maybe you would.


    What a hack. It would be nice if the tool allowed multiple colors.

    Hmm. I guess I’d need a little more detail on exactly what you feel is a “hack” and which tool you’re referring to in order to address your concern.


    How do you color correct across two tracks (that is, a left and a right channel from two cameras with slightly different colors) before making a 3D subclip?

    Use the same techniques that I showed in this presentation. The split-screen preview techniques I showed should come in particularly handy here.


    What was the key stroke for the copy to clipboard for the split screen?

    There is no keyboard shortcut for this function. To copy the current frame to the clipboard, click the Copy Snapshot to Clipboard button at the top of the Video Preview window.


    Video effects signal flow

    What has the highest priority of effects, track level or event level?

    I assume you’re asking about how video effects fall in the video signal chain. First, event-level clips are the most specific and they only affect the event that they are applied to. Media-level effects are quite targeted to and only affect the clip that they are applied to. However, this could affect the video in many events on your timeline if those events all hold that same media clip. Track-level effects are more encompassing in that they affect any event on the track. And finally, project-level events cast the widest net of all and affect every video asset in your project.


    How do you apply a correction to multiple clips in the project?

    You can copy the effects chain from one event in your project and paste it into others. To do this, right-click the event that has the chain you want to copy and choose Copy from the menu. Then, right-click the event you want to apply the chain to and choose Paste Event Attributes from the menu. Since this doesn’t always give you the result you’re after (since other attributes such as Event Pan/Crop would also be copied and pasted), another way to achieve this objective is to put all of the events that you want to correct with an effect onto the same track and then apply the correction to the track instead of individual events.


    I think you can add these filters to both the clip, to an event, to a track, and to the video bus. In terms of workflow is it better to initially color match the clips (that is, standardize the colors) before applying a "film look" color correction, or to correct each event?

    Generally speaking, yes it would be best to clear up any color issues that you have before applying a “film look” to the footage. That said, the best approach is the one that gives you the best results. Try it both ways and decide which you think looks better.


    How do you apply Brightness and Contrast directly to a clip without picking it from the FX list?

    I don’t really understand the question. If you want to apply any filter to a clip, track, event, or your entire project, you have to pick it from the list and add it to the appropriate effects chain.


    Monitoring your color correction work

    When adjusting color, brightness or contrast, the effect will apply to the entire clip. When you look at the preview window you are looking at a frame. Are the histogram/waveform scopes looking at the frame or clip?

    By default, the video scopes show you just the frame you’re sitting on. If you play your project, the scopes still show you just the frame that you were at when you started playback. However, you can set the scopes to update as your project plays. To do so, click the Update Scopes while Playing button at the top of the Video Scopes window.


    Do you use a CRT monitor for color correction?

    You could. If you intend to deliver your video to mainly CRT monitors, then this might be a great idea. On the other hand, if you will deliver to flatscreen LCD monitors, then a CRT reference monitor may not be the best choice.


    Sometimes when you exceed the range of adjustment, you can see an acceptable image in your computer monitor, but it doesn’t look right in your video reference monitor. Is there a way to solve this problem?

    This issue probably stems from the same difference between computer RGB and Studio RBG that we’ve discussed in the answers to other questions. Your computer has a wider color range than broadcast equipment and television.


    When I try to make adjustments to an under exposed image, the result in the computer monitor is really amazing, but the final result is grainy, the contrast is inaccurate and the overall quality is poor. Why?

    It is difficult to know exactly why without seeing the project file. However, one reason for this may be that your computer monitor has not been properly calibrated. If you are sure that the colors have been calibrated properly, the best thing to do is preview your footage on an external monitor. This will give you the best representation before you render it out.


    Is it correct to say that consumer displays usually display high contrast/saturation? If so, is it better to deliver high-contrast/high-saturation material or more low contrast/desaturated video?

    I don’t know whether it’s correct to say that or not. But I do know that if you’re serious about delivering video that looks good, you should use a properly-calibrated professional video reference monitor while making your color decisions.


    Questions about specific filters and controls

    Will you please share a few words on the Sony Soft Contrast filter? Is it a separate universal color correction tool? It has some nice presets indeed.

    The Soft Contrast filter is just one of several other video effect filters that I didn’t have time to talk about but which can be used effectively for color correction work. You can use it separately or in conjunction with any of the filters I discussed during the presentation.


    What filter would you use to colorize black and white footage?

    If you’re talking about adding an overall tint to the footage, you could use the Sepia filter, the Color Curves filter, and various other filters for that. If you’re talking about making the actor’s eyes blue, his shirt red, his car yellow, and so on, there is really no efficient way to do that in Vegas Pro. Vegas Pro was simply not created for that type of colorization work.


    What does the Broadcast Colors filter do?

    This filter helps you clamp the colors in your project from the 16 million or more colors that you can see on most modern computer monitors down to the 2 million or so colors that can be seen on a television (especially relevant to older CRT-based televisions).


    Doesn't color curves combine the brightness/contrast and levels effects so you could use it exclusively?

    If I understand the Curves filter correctly (and I don’t guarantee that I do!), then yes. The Curves tool is a very sophisticated and robust tool that can help you achieve many things beyond the simple example I used it for during the webinar. Check the tool’s presets and you do indeed see options that relate to contrast, brightness, and others. The Curves tool is one which may well be worth mastering.


    Shouldn't my first step in color correction always be white balance?

    Yes. In fact, your very first step is to white balance your camera before you shoot so that you can avoid all of these nasty problems in the first place! Vegas Pro does provide white balance tools that you can use to correct for improperly balanced footage and yes, you should probably make that your first step in most cases.


    How do you know when to select the Levels filter or just the Brightness and Contrast filter? Is there any feature in the video you can use as a guide?

    How do you know when to select the Levels filter or just the Brightness and Contrast filter? Is there any feature in the video you can use as a guide?


    Would you please elaborate on the function of "Contrast Center" slider in Brightness and Contrast?

    The Contrast Center setting specifies the anchor point for distributing the video’s color values. You can see this plainly with help from the Histogram video scope. Add the Brightness and Contrast filter to a video event. Then, choose View | Video Scopes to open the Video Scopes window. Set the Video Scopes to view the Histogram. Now, decrease the contrast in the Brightness and Contrast filter until the histogram shows a very concentrated shape in the middle of the histogram graph area. Finally, adjust the Contrast Center slider. As you do, watch as the histogram graph slides to the left and right. Notice that the graph does not change shape (as long as you don’t go so far as to butt up against on or the other edge of the graph), it simply slides back and forth as you change the location of the center. This has the effect of lightening (as you move the center to the right) or darkening (as you move the center to the left) your video.


    Hi, Mid, and Lo refers to what in the Color Corrector filter?

    These terms refer to color tones in your video. Your Lo tones would be the blacks and other dark colors in your video, like a deep shadow. Mid tones are more gray or neutral in nature. Think of the gray look of a concrete sidewalk. Hi tones would be your bright colors like white.


    Can you explain gamma?

    Gamma determines the brightness of the video and is used to compensate for differences between the source and output video. Higher gamma values result in lighter or brighter video as displayed on your computer's monitor.


    With levels and curves, is it required to open up a new instance of the effect to adjust each color channel? As a long time Photoshop user, I'm used to being able to go into each channel while using only one instance.

    The Color Curves filter works the way you want it to. You can select one color, adjust its curve, then select a different color and adjust its curve without affecting the first. The Levels filter on the other hand does not work this way. With the Levels filter, you would need more than one instance of the filter in the chain.


    Personal preference here: I prefer to start with Color Curves for initial adjustments. Brightness and contrast are carry-overs from early analog TVs and not really the best tools to start with for many people familiar with other common "tools for creatives." Curves can actually replace both Brightness and Contrast and Levels.

    I’m no expert, but from what I’ve read, you’re right. However, for those who are just getting started working with color correction, the Color Curves tool can be difficult to master. The Brightness and Contrast filter is the easiest of the three to understand and use and not a bad place to start when you’re just getting your feet wet.


    Video Scopes

    Is there a histogram in the color correction tool?

    No, but there is a Histogram in the Video Scopes window.


    What are the numbers on the histogram or other video scopes referring too?

    The numbers across the top of the histogram represent luminance values from 0 (black) to 255 (white). The histogram graph then, shows how the content of your video is distributed along the luminance range.


    How did you get to the video scopes?

    To open the Video Scopes window, choose View | Video Scopes.


    So is it desirable to make the upper edge of the histogram even and level?

    Technically, I don’t know. But no, I don’t think that would be desirable at all. I’m not even sure how you’d accomplish that anyway, but it would essentially mean that all of your video’s luminance levels were identical and that wouldn’t look natural. At least, that’s my theory!


    Could you talk briefly about the Video Scope called RGB Parade?

    The RGB Parade monitor in the Video Scopes window plots waveforms for the red, green, and blue components of your video signal from 0-255. For more information on scopes, view the free training video Using the Vegas Pro Color Scopes at www.sonycreativesoftware.com/support/trainingvids.asp?prod=vegaspro.


    When the histogram is not full but has spaces between the lines, is that because of lack of detail?

    I guess you could say that—sometimes. It’s due to a lack of color luminance. This could be caused by setting the contrast of your video too high which results in the loss of color luminance in some colors (for example, some colors are lost completely and replaced by black), which I guess you could describe as loss of detail. Keep in mind that this doesn’t always indicate a problem in your video. For example, if you add the Small Tiles preset of the Checkerboard media generator and view it in the histogram, you’ll see the space between the lines that you’re talking about because of all the black squares alternating with the white squares. You might also create this situation if you’ve cranked the contrast up on a video in attempt to purposely create some sort of special effect.


    How do you know when to adjust highlight or shadow by looking at monitor or graphs?

    In order to answer that, I would have to know which monitor or graph you are referring to specifically. Generally speaking, there are no exact rules as to when you should be adjusting any of these settings. It just depends on what you judge needs to be adjusted in the video. There are some general guidelines and the video scopes give you some clues. For instance, a histogram that shows that the majority of the video information is at the high end of the luminance spectrum might indicate that you should darken your video a bit. A histogram that shows that your material is very concentrated in a narrow range of the luminance spectrum could indicate that increasing the video’s contrast might help you achieve better results. These are just clues though. The ultimate tools for judging the perfect settings are your eyes.


    Are the limits in video scopes set to broadcast values?

    No. They represent the computer color space from 0 to 255.


    What is the best histogram of video?

    I don’t think there is one “best” histogram. In general though, a histogram that spreads out nicely over the entire range is desirable. Still, you can’t make the judgment based on the shape of the histogram. You have to look at the video and determine whether it looks good or not.


    Once you have corrected a frame, how do you copy to a range of frames?

    I’m not exactly sure whether you really mean to use the word frame or if you’re referring to events on the timeline or something else. Assuming you do indeed mean frames, the effect plug-ins that I apply to an event will affect every frame of video in the event.


    What is the best and quickest way to match two cameras?

    talked about this in the presentation when I used the Split Screen function to compare two different clips in two events and then used a filter to try and match them. What’s the “best and quickest” way to do it? That depends upon many variables that range from the footage to your experience. In general, copy the frame you like to the clipboard, set your preview to split-screen mode viewing the clipboard, place your timeline cursor on a frame from the other clip that you want to correct, then add an appropriate filter to the event that needs correcting, and set to work fixing the problem, all the while comparing the two frames until they match.


    The rest

    Can you correct his red hand now?

    You’re referring to the clip of the guitar player. Yes, I could add another filter and try to zero in on the red tint on his hand. That hand is being hit fairly directly by a light with a red gel on it, so it could be a difficult task, but I could certainly give it a shot.


    Is there any way to add red back into a video that was shot underwater without a corrective filter?

    Yes, several of the filters we talked about during the webinar may help you here. Specifically, you might experiment with the Color Corrector and Color Curves filters to see what you can do with them.


    Is this correction over the whole clip?

    I’m not sure exactly what you’re referring to, but in the Question and Answer portion we discussed the different places where you can apply effects. If you apply effects at the media level (in the Project Media window), then the effect will be applied to the entire media clip regardless of where it is used in the project. If you apply the effect to an event, then it is applied only to the portion of the clip that that specific event holds.


    How can you avoid adding noise or graininess to a clip you brighten that was too dark or underexposed?

    You’ll just have to experiment with various methods for making the video brighter. If the noise is in the video, it will be tough not to accentuate it as you brighten it.


    How do these filters affect the quality of the video? Do they introduce video noise and grain?

    Used properly and in moderation the filters won’t add noise (unless you’re talking about the Add Noise filter or other filters that are intended to create noise), but they could accentuate noise that already exists.


    Why not subtract green?

    I assume you’re referring to the section where I added red to the video in order to create a more natural skin tone for the Caucasian men in the video. I added red because that gave me results I was happy with. Removing green might have made me just as happy, less happy, or happier. You just have to experiment and use the method that gives you the results you feel are best.


    Why does color correction sometimes create artifacts?

    I’d have to see exactly what you mean by “artifacts,” but generally these tools enable you to adjust colors in very powerful ways. You can easily create colors that are clamped or stretched, overly saturated, over contrasted, too bright, too dark, and on and on. As with any powerful tool, you’ll have to be careful when you use them so that you don’t create problems in your attempt to solve different problems.


    On a recent shoot, I was filming on a Canon 5D mk2 in a totally white studio (with an infinity wall, etc.) and although the whites showed up OK on the camera screen, when imported into Vegas Pro, the footage had a strong yellow cast over it. What is the best way to restore true whites?

    Use the Vegas Pro White Balance filter. In the Video FX window, choose White Balance from the list of filters and drag the Reset to None preset onto the event that holds the video you need to correct. Click the Select White Color button in the White Balance filter and then click something in your video that you know should be white. If you’re not happy with the results, adjust the controls manually to see if you can do better. If still not happy, repeat the procedure, this time clicking on a different point of white or dragging across a larger area of white.







     
    Follow Us Online Facebook Twitter YouTube Email Sign up:  Submit
     
    Sony Creative Software inspires artistic expression with its award-winning line of products for digital video, music, DVD, and audio production.

    Sound Forge, ACID, and Vegas software have defined digital content creation for a generation of creative professionals, amateurs, and enthusiasts.

    © 2003-2014 Sony Creative Software Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    Software
    ACID Pro
    ACID Music Studio
    Photo Go
    Sound Forge Pro
    Sound Forge Audio Studio
    Vegas Pro
    Vegas Movie Studio
    Vegas Movie Studio Platinum
    All Software
    Royalty-Free Content
    Loops & Samples: Premium
    Loops & Samples: Standard
    Loops & Samples: Classic
    All Loops & Samples
    Artist Integrated Loops
    Sound Effects
    Vision Series
    All Content
    Download
    Free Downloads
    Trials and Demos
    Updates
    Manuals
    Whitepapers
    Utilities
    Development Kits
    All Downloads
    Other
    Product Support
    Customer Service
    Affiliate Program
    Register Software
    Training & Tutorials
    Press Releases
    Newsletters
    Showcase
    Site Map
     
    McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams Sony.com